Displaced

DISPLACED

women in exile

This photoreportage was initiated by the European Parliament, in order to illustrate the faith of women refugees and asylum seekers, all along their difficult journey through Europe.

It was shot between December 1st of 2015 and January 15th of 2016, in Greece, Macedonia and Germany.

 

 

In 2015, almost 850 000 migrants, mainly Syrians, Afghans and Iraqis, tried to cross to Greece from the Turkish coast. Hundreds of people arrive on the beaches of the Greek islands every day. More often than not they cross in these inflatable zodiac boats, with traffickers managing to cram in over 50 people on each boat.

Something new has emerged in recent months: women and children now account for over half the passengers. Often four generations of the same family are fleeing war, violence or terror together.

 

No sooner do the refugees arrive on the Greek coast than they are taken by bus to the Moria reception centre. This is the first ‘hotspot’ centre for registering their arrival in Europe. It is also where they are first separated according to nationality. Where the selection is made, between the “good” migrants, fleeing war zones and the “bad” economic migrants. European doors will open -slightly- for the Syrians, Iraqis and Afghans but will stay desperately closed for all the others.

 

Then only, the refugees can start their long journey towards northern Europe, via the so called “Balkan road”.

At the Gevgelija transit camp in Macedonia, train convoys arranged by state authorities await them. Men, women, children, old people and babies in arms cram indiscriminately into the overcrowded carriages. Next stop : Serbia.

 

When the refugees finally arrive in Passau, a small German town on the border with Austria, the end of their journey is almost in sight. Here they can finally apply for asylum so they can stay in Europe. At the ‘Paul-Hallen’ registration centre it is one check after another: they are searched as are the few belongings with which they fled, identification documents are checked, fingerprints taken... The procedure is quick and runs smoothly.

Then one final train journey to a host town in Germany, one they have not chosen themselves.

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Displaced

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Lesbos, Greece. The Turkish authorities estimate that almost 850 000 migrants, mainly Syrians, Afghans and Iraqis, tried to cross to Greece from the Turkish coast in 2015. Hundreds of people arrive on the beaches of the Greek islands every day.
Lesbos, Greece. More often than not refugees cross in these inflatable zodiac boats, with traffickers managing to cram in over 50 people on each boat.
Lesbos, Greece. A young Greek volunteer from the sea rescue corps comforts an Iraqi refugee. Sunduz, 34 years old, a Kurd from Iraq, fled Mosul and Daesh three months ago with her husband and their two young children. Pregnant and in a state of shock afte
Lesbos, Greece. Something new has emerged in recent months: women and children now account for over half the passengers. Often four generations of the same family are fleeing war, violence or terror together.
Lesbos, Greece. The passengers in these makeshift boats, and the women and children in particular, are highly traumatised by a crossing they know to be dangerous. Most of them do not know how to swim and have never even seen the sea before.
Lesbos, Greece. The passengers in these makeshift boats, and the women and children in particular, are highly traumatised by a crossing they know to be dangerous. Most of them do not know how to swim and have never even seen the sea before.
Lesbos, Greece. On their arrival they are met by volunteers from all over Europe, who help them disembark from the boats and hand out survival blankets, hot drinks, fruit and sweets.
Lesbos, Greece. On their arrival they are met by volunteers from all over Europe, who help them disembark from the boats and hand out survival blankets, hot drinks, fruit and sweets.
Lesbos, Greece. On their arrival they are met by volunteers from all over Europe, who help them disembark from the boats and hand out survival blankets, hot drinks, fruit and sweets.
Lesbos, Greece. No sooner do the refugees arrive on the Greek coast than they are taken by bus to the Moria reception centre.
Lesbos, Greece. Moria is the first ‘hotspot’ centre for registering their arrival in Europe. It is also where they are first separated according to nationality.
Moria ‘Hotspot’, Lesbos, Greece. The wait for the registration procedure is a long one. Families have to queue for hours.
Moria ‘Hotspot’, Lesbos, Greece. The wait for the registration procedure is a long one. Families have to queue for hours.
Moria ‘Hotspot’, Lesbos, Greece. The wait for the registration procedure is a long one. Families have to queue for hours.
Mytilini's harbour, Lesbos, Greece. Refugees, after being registered at Moria camp, wait to board the ferry to Athens.
Moria ‘Hotspot’, Lesbos, Greece. When darkness falls, many of them have to spend the night in what was originally a transit camp. Here danger lurks and overcrowding is the norm, creating an additional source of anxiety for the women
Moria ‘Hotspot’, Lesbos, Greece. When darkness falls, many of them have to spend the night in what was originally a transit camp. Here danger lurks and overcrowding is the norm, creating an additional source of anxiety for the women
The international aid organisations present in the camp provide a range of services and relief: distribution of tents, clothing, food, medical care, psychological help but they have been overwhelmed by the huge numbers of migrants arriving in recentmonths
Moria ‘Hotspot’, Lesbos, Greece. When darkness falls, many of them have to spend the night in what was originally a transit camp. Here danger lurks and overcrowding is the norm, creating an additional source of anxiety for the women
Gevgelija, border post between Greece and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. Only refugees from countries at war (Syrians, Iraqis and Afghans) were allowed, not so long ago, to cross the border and continue their journey to northern Europe
Gevgelija, border post between Greece and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. Only refugees from countries at war (Syrians, Iraqis and Afghans) were allowed, not so long ago, to cross the border and continue their journey to northern Europe
Gevgelija, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. Only refugees from countries at war (Syrians, Iraqis and Afghans) were allowed, not so long ago, to cross the border and continue their journey to northern Europe, as the European Union had agreed they may
Gevgelija, border post between Greece and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. Only refugees from countries at war (Syrians, Iraqis and Afghans) were allowed, not so long ago, to cross the border and continue their journey to northern Europe
Gevgelija, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. At the Gevgelija transit camp, train convoys arranged by state authorities await the refugees. Families eager to continue their journey to northern Europe pile onto the trains. Men, women, children, old pe
Gevgelija, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. At the Gevgelija transit camp, train convoys arranged by state authorities await the refugees. Families eager to continue their journey to northern Europe pile onto the trains. Men, women, children, old pe
Gevgelija, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. At the Gevgelija transit camp, train convoys arranged by state authorities await the refugees. Families eager to continue their journey to northern Europe pile onto the trains. Men, women, children, old pe
Gevgelija, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. At the Gevgelija transit camp, train convoys arranged by state authorities await the refugees. Families eager to continue their journey to northern Europe pile onto the trains. Men, women, children, old pe
Gevgelija, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. At the Gevgelija transit camp, train convoys arranged by state authorities await the refugees. Families eager to continue their journey to northern Europe pile onto the trains. Men, women, children, old pe
Tabanovtsé  train station, Macedonia. The trains coming directly from the Greek border stop here. A few kilometers further is the border with Serbia.
Tabanovtsé  train station, Macedonia. The trains coming directly from the Greek border stop here. A few kilometers further is the border with Serbia.
Paul-Hallen’ registration centre, Passau, Germany. When the refugees arrive in this small German town on the border with Austria the end of their journey is almost in sight. Here they can finally apply for asylum so they can stay in Europe. At the ‘Paul-H
Paul-Hallen’ registration centre, Passau, Germany. When the refugees arrive in this small German town on the border with Austria the end of their journey is almost in sight. Here they can finally apply for asylum so they can stay in Europe. At the ‘Paul-H
Paul-Hallen’ registration centre, Passau, Germany. When the refugees arrive in this small German town on the border with Austria the end of their journey is almost in sight. Here they can finally apply for asylum so they can stay in Europe. At the ‘Paul-H
Paul-Hallen’ registration centre, Passau, Germany. When the refugees arrive in this small German town on the border with Austria the end of their journey is almost in sight. Here they can finally apply for asylum so they can stay in Europe. At the ‘Paul-H
Passau train station, Germany. Refugees await for the final train journey to a host town in Germany, one they have not chosen themselves.
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